The WaterRower Classic Rower has been designed to optimize ease of storage. Simply lift one end and the machine stores conveniently upright in about the space of a dining room chair. The WaterRower Classic Rower has a light wooden frame, the positioning of the WaterFlywheel close to the wheels, and the leverage effect provided by the rails, makes lifting almost effortless. When stored the WaterRower's patented WaterFlywheel provides a low center of gravity making the machine very stable.
While rowing, the athlete sits in the boat facing toward the stern, and uses the oars which are held in place by the oarlocks to propel the boat forward (towards the bow). This may be done on a canal, river, lake, sea, or other large bodies of water. The sport requires strong core balance, physical strength, flexibility, and cardiovascular endurance.[5]
Decreasing  speed of waves as water becomes shallow has dramatic consequences on the beach. As the waves slow, their profile (Figure on right) is laterally compressed and since each wave must carry the same energy it becomes higher. As the wave approaches shore this process continues until the height exceeds 1/7 th the wave length and the wave becomes unstable. Then the wave breaks.
Unlike most other non-combat sports, rowing has a special weight category called lightweight (Lwt for short). According to FISA, this weight category was introduced "to encourage more universality in the sport especially among nations with less statuesque people". The first lightweight events were held at the World Championships in 1974 for men and 1985 for women. Lightweight rowing was added to the Olympics in 1996.

The Concept2 Model D Indoor Rowing Machine includes the excellent PM5 monitor that provides all vital data. It can display your workout performance in two ways. You can choose to see your workout in total distance and time, or as “splits”. Splits is a way of seeing how your pace is varying along two set points. Either way is useful, but splits give you more of a “real-time”, in the moment calculation of how you are doing.
WaterRower Dimensions: 83'' x 22'' x 21'' / Weight: 108 Lbs (At Minimum Water Level)Built For Light Commercial Use & Practically M...aintenance Free, Rowing Machine Targets All Major Muscle Groups (84% Of Total Muscle Mass) W/ Excellent Adjustable Resistance LevelsMade W/ Kiln Dried Harwood; Danish Oil & Urethane Finish For Better Wood Performance/Strength & Cozy Feel To Your GymBoasts A Patented Water Flywheel That Mimics The Natural Dynamics Of Rowing Yet Suitable For Users W/ Joint Concerns (Chlorine Tablet Is Available Free Of Charge)Enjoy 1 Year Manufacturer's Warranty (Upgradeable To 3-Year Parts While 5-Year Frame Is Free Of Charge W/ Registration)Comes W/ The S4 Performance Monitor For QuickStart Of Functions And Displays Intensity, Kcalories Per Hour, Strokerate, Heartrate, And More!Storage Dimensions: 21'' x 22'' x 83'' (Easily Store It On End)Entry Height Is At 12'' (At 20'' W/ Optional Hi-Rise Adaptor)Noise/Intrusion Levels: Soothing & Relaxing/Minimal read more
Get the WaterRower S1 Indoor Rowing Machine w/ S4 Monitor for your home gym! This exercise equipment targets compound muscles such... as arms, legs, back, and glutes. It's the perfect workout as if you're actually driving a boat with oars. Its construction features a stainless steel makeup with brushed finish--giving it high durability. Moreover, it boasts a patented water flywheel responsible for its natural rowing dynamic. Enjoy self-regulating resistance levels--making it suitable for individuals with joint concerns, along with little maintenance required by replacing the chlorine tablet every 2-6 months. Other specifications include maximum user weight and height of 1000 pounds and 38-inch inseam. What's more, it comes with the S4 performance monitor that displays intensity, Kcalories per hour, Strokerate, Heartrate, and more! So avail a WaterRower S1 Indoor Rowing Machine w/ S4 Monitor today! read more
The first known "modern" rowing races began from competition among the professional watermen in the United Kingdom that provided ferry and taxi service on the River Thames in London. Prizes for wager races were often offered by the London Guilds and Livery Companies or wealthy owners of riverside houses.[10] The oldest surviving such race, Doggett's Coat and Badge was first contested in 1715 and is still held annually from London Bridge to Chelsea.[12] During the 19th century these races were to become numerous and popular, attracting large crowds. Prize matches amongst professionals similarly became popular on other rivers throughout Great Britain in the 19th century, notably on the Tyne. In America, the earliest known race dates back to 1756 in New York, when a pettiauger defeated a Cape Cod whaleboat in a race.[13]
WaterRower For over 20 years, WaterRower has been providing the world with rowing machines that demonstrate the physical and physi...ological benefits of rowing. Rowing is a complete aerobic exercise routine that works 84 percent of muscle mass and gives maximum results - you burn more calories in less time and have fun, too. Rowing combines aerobic exercise with resistance all in a smooth, rhythmic exercise. It's suitable for people of all shapes and sizes and is easy on the joints.WaterRower is committed to being environmentally conscious. Their rowing machines are made using only the world's finest hardwoods specially selected from replenishable sources where more wood is planted than harvested. Because WaterRower machines are people- powered, no electricity is required! WaterRower rowing machines help you burn calories, tone muscles, and be kind to the environment. read more
At the catch the rower places the blade in the water and applies pressure to the oar by pushing the seat toward the bow of the boat by extending the legs, thus pushing the boat through the water. The point of placement of the blade in the water is a relatively fixed point about which the oar serves as a lever to propel the boat. As the rower's legs approach full extension, the rower pivots the torso toward the bow of the boat and then finally pulls the arms towards his or her chest. The hands meet the chest right above the diaphragm.
In sweep or sweep-oar rowing, each rower has one oar, held with both hands. This is generally done in pairs, fours, and eights. In some regions of the world, each rower in a sweep boat is referred to either as port or starboard, depending on which side of the boat the rower's oar extends to. In other regions, the port side is referred to as stroke side, and the starboard side as bow side; this applies even if the stroke oarsman is rowing on bow side and/or the bow oarsman on stroke side.
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